Radiant heat sensor

Pressure Atomizing Oil Burner Equipment and Systems – Fuel Flow and Combustion Controls

Accession # HHCC.2006.109
Exhibit: Heating

The “Protectostat”, a late 1940’s radiant heat sensor for combustion safety control. It would set new standard for combustion safety for higher firing rate, oil atomizing heating systems found in large Canadian estate homes, institutions and small industrial applications. Sited directly on the fire, it used a black metal diaphragm to mechanically actuate a low voltage control system through a Minneapolis Honeywell “Protectorelay”, Minneapolis Honeywell, Type A, Circa 1948.



Item: Radiant heat sensor
Manufacturer: Minneapolis Honeywell Regulator Co.
Make: Minneapolis Honeywell
Model: Type A
Features:
– Handsome corporate name plate and logo in red, black and chrome

Technical Significance:
– Mounted adjacent to the burner fire tube, the device immediately sensed the radiant heat of combustion, providing here-to-for unheard of rapid response needed for the safe and satisfactory operation of larger oil fired boilers and furnaces, operating in the range of 3 to 12 gallons per minute of number 2 or 3 fuel oil.
– The Protectostat operated a Minneapolis Protectorelay, consisting of electro-magnetic switches and a thermal safety, automatic cut out timing device.
– The Protectostat with Protectorelay would become the standard of the industry for institutional and small commercial and industrial, automatic oil fired systems until the introduction of photo-electric eye, electronic sensing technology in the 1950’s, see reference.
– These embryonic, electric automated systems were representative of the early introduction of complex systems into Canadian homes and places of business. See Note #2

Industrial Significance:
– The potential explosive power of several gallons per minute of high pressure vapourized fuel oil being sprayed into a combustion chamber is awesome and a source of fear to system owners, operators and service people alike. The importance of fast response for safety shut down in case of delayed ignition on unattended, automatic systems is paramount. The development of the radiant heat sensor opened up new applications for automatic operation of boilers, where operating engineers in constant attendance became unnecessary under certain conditions.


Hard fire brick

Pressure Atomizing Oil Burner Equipment and Systems – Other Components and Parts

Accession # HHCC.2006.119
Exhibit: Heating

In the embryonic and early development years of automatic, oil heating systems in Canada, high temperature fire brick were the building blocks of the “fire box” [combustion chamber]. The firebox, holding a 2.600 degree F. flame in check, was a critical component, determining both system safety and performance. It would be skilfully crafted on-the-job, according to the size of the fire chamber, the combustion rate and the unique flame configuration of the oil burner, hard fire brick, A P Green, Circa 1938.



Item: Hard fire brick
Manufacturer: A P Green, Toronto
Make: A P Green
Model: A – Empire DP

Technical Significance:
In the embryonic and early development years of automatic, oil heating systems in Canada, high temperature “Hard” fire brick were the building blocks of the “fire box” [combustion chamber]. Shaped much like regular bricks, but made from clays withstanding high temperature.

The firebox, holding a 2.600 degree F. flame in check, was a critical component, determining both system safety and performance, a matter of concern for the installer and technician.

It would be skilfully crafted on-the-job, according to the combustion rate and the unique flame configuration of the oil burner the size of the fire chamber and the gut feel of the installer.

Industrial Significance:
The construction of fireboxes was an art form of the day, with all to often little for the installer to guide him in a wide range of decisions to be made, effecting the performance of the oil burner and the safety of the system see references.

Most heating automatic oil heating systems of the 1920’s on into the 40’s in Canada were of the “conversion” type, typically coal and wood fired furnaces and boilers in which oil burners were installed. Wood and coal grates were removed and firebrick used to build a box like configuration, typically, but not always, with a hole at one end to receive the blast tube of the oil burner.

With the evolution of the industry came softer lighter fire brick, see ID#244, as well as pre-cast moulded refractory materials, in a range of sizes, pre-shaped for certain firing rates and fire chambers, see ID#245.

The significant developments in ceramics engineering, reflected in the refractory materials of the period, should not be understated, for they made possible the evolution of automatic home heating and its seminal contribution to life in Canada. An unobtrusive technology in the public eye, the accomplishments in ceramics engineering tend to get lost in the midst of the Gee-Whiz technological achievements in combustion and electric control engineering of the 1920’s and 30’s.

By the 1960’s much ceramic-based combustion chamber engineering would give way to light weight stainless steel configurations, considered preferable for the new world of unitary equipment, pre-tested and shipped to the job site ready for installation.


‘Soft’ fire brick

Pressure Atomizing Oil Burner Equipment and Systems – Other Components and Parts

Accession # HHCC.2006.120
Exhibit: Heating

In the embryonic and early development years of automatic, oil heating systems in Canada, high temperature fire brick were the building blocks of the “fire box” [combustion chamber]. The firebox, holding a 2.600 degree F. flame in check, was a critical component, determining both system safety and performance. It would be skilfully crafted on-the-job, according to the size of the fire chamber, the combustion rate and the unique flame configuration of the oil burner, “soft” fire brick, A P Green, Circa 1940.



Item: ‘Soft’ fire brick
Manufacturer: A P Green, Toronto
Make: A P Green

Technical Significance:
With the evolution of the industry came soft light weight fire brick, as well as pre-cast moulded refractory materials, in a range of sizes, pre-shaped for certain firing rates and fire chambers, see ID#245

In the embryonic and early development years of automatic, oil heating systems in Canada, high temperature fire brick were the building blocks of the “fire box” [combustion chamber]. Shaped much like regular bricks, but made from clays withstanding high temperature

The firebox, holding a 2.600 degree F. flame in check, was a critical component, determining both system safety and performance, a matter of concern for the installer and technician.

It would be skilfully crafted on-the-job, according to the combustion rate and the unique flame configuration of the oil burner the size of the fire chamber and the gut feel of the installer.

Industrial Significance:
The construction of fireboxes was an art form of the day, with all to often little for the installer to guide him in a wide range of decisions to be made, effecting the performance of the oil burner and the safety of the system see references

Most heating automatic oil heating systems of the 1920’s on into the 40’s in Canada were of the “conversion” type, typically coal and wood fired furnaces and boilers in which oil burners were installed. Wood and coal grates were removed and firebrick used to build a box like configuration, typically, but not always, with a hole at one end to receive the blast tube of the oil burner.

The significant developments in ceramics engineering, reflected in the refractory materials of the period, should not be understated, for they made possible the evolution of automatic home heating and its seminal contribution to life in Canada. An unobtrusive technology in the public eye, the accomplishments in ceramics engineering tend to get lost in the midst of the Gee-Whiz technological achievements in combustion and electric control engineering of the 1920’s and 30’s.

By the 1960’s much ceramic-based combustion chamber engineering would give way to light weight stainless steel configurations, considered preferable for the new world of unitary equipment, pre-tested and shipped to the job site ready for installation.


Fire box sections

Pressure Atomizing Oil Burner Equipment and Systems – Other Components and Parts

Accession # HHCC.2006.121
Exhibit: Heating

Pre-cast, sectional, circular, high temperature refractory sections, made in a range of sizes and compositions, became widely used starting in the 1940’s for the construction of “fire boxes” [combustion chambers]. The firebox, holding a 2.600 degree F. flame in check, was a critical component, determining both system safety and performance, 2 sections, model 424, A P Green, Circa 1945.



Item: Fire box sections
Manufacturer: A P Green, Toronto
Make: A P Green
Model: 424

Technical Significance:
With the evolution of the industry came pre-formed, sectional, circular refractory sections in a range of sizes, pre-shaped for certain firing rates and fire chambers

The evolution of pre-formed, sectional, circular refractory was hastened by the development of unitary, factory made and assembled warm air furnaces, winter air conditioners and hot water home heating boilers. Shipped to the job site this equipment came complete with oil burner, refractory and control system reedy for installation.

Industrial Significance:
With the evolution of unitary equipment for residential heating in Canada came generally higher levels of system performance, reliability and safety, with much of the guess work required with the conversion of hand fired wood and coal fired systems gone.

The significant developments in ceramics engineering, reflected in the refractory materials of the period, should not be understated, for they made possible the evolution of automatic home heating and its seminal contribution to life in Canada. An unobtrusive technology in the public eye, the accomplishments in ceramics engineering tend to get lost in the midst of the Gee-Whiz technological achievements in combustion and electric control engineering of the 1920’s and 30’s.

By the 1960’s much ceramic-based combustion chamber engineering would give way to light weight stainless steel configurations, considered preferable for the new world of unitary equipment, pre-tested and shipped to the job site ready for installation.


Set of inside diameter gauges

Electric Motors – Installation, Test and Repair

Accession # HHCC.2006.214
Exhibit: Ventilation

Set of 4 telescoping inside gauges, range ? inch to 2 1/8 inches, varying in thousands of an inch. Each is beautifully crafted in machine steel with spring loaded plunger, knurled handle and knurled locking screw embedded in the handle, an example of the precision tools available to Canadian machinists and HVACR mechanics by the 1940’s – on which they would depend. Used, among other things, to measure the inside diameter of electric motor bearings, compressor cylinder displacement etc. In hansom, slide-top, wooden box, Model 229, Starrett, Circa 1942.


Two inch Micrometer calliper

Electric Motors – Installation, Test and Repair

Accession # HHCC.2006.215
Exhibit: Ventilation

Two inch Micrometer calliper for measuring by thousandths from one inch to two inches, with ratchet stop, knurled handle, and fraction/decimal equivalent chart engraved on yoke in 32nds and 64ths. An example of the precision tools available to Canadian machinists and HVACR mechanics by the 1940’s – on which they would be dependent. Used, among other things, to measure the diameter of electric motor bearings, compressor pistons, etc. Beranta, Circa 1942.


Bearing scraper

Electric Motors – Installation, Test and Repair

Accession # HHCC.2006.216
Exhibit: Ventilation

An 11 inch, narrow, bearing scraper, with 3 inch blade, designed for “modern bearings”, with black, turned, wooden handle and steel furl, an early 20th century tool for hand fitting journal bearings, “VLC4BK” CLEV’D.O., Circa 1930.


4 blade small bearing reamers

Electric Motors – Installation, Test and Repair

Accession # HHCC.2006.217
Exhibit: Ventilation

Set of 4 blade, small bearing reamers in sizes from ? to 7/16 inches, used in HVACR equipment repair shop for the fitting of small, FHP electric motor bearings, in the 1940’s through 1960’s. Set of 7 enclosed in original blue, heavy card, custom case, with Beard logo and name plate stencilled in gold and blue, Circa 1945.


6 blade bearing reamers

Electric Motors – Installation, Test and Repair

Accession # HHCC.2006.218
Exhibit: Ventilation

Set of 6 blade, bearing reamers in sizes from 7/16 to 1 1/8 inches, used in HVACR equipment repair shop for the fitting of FHP electric motor bearings, in the 1930’s through 1960’s. Set of 9 enclosed in original heavy oak, clear varnished, custom case with manufacturer’s label, insignia and specifications in gold and black, Circa 1939.


Long 6 blade bearing reamers

Electric Motors – Installation, Test and Repair

Accession # HHCC.2006.219
Exhibit: Ventilation

Set of 6 blade, extra long, alignment bearing reamers, six in Snap-On, Blue Point case, sizes from ? to 1 1/16; with four supplementary reamers to extend range from 9/16 to 15/16, all with tapered self-alignment pilots, used in HVACR equipment repair shop for the fitting of FHP electric motor bearings, in the 1950’s through 1960’s, Variously made by Snap-On, Joborn and Webco, Circa 1958


3-5 HP compressor ‘T6-53’

Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Compressors – Commercial

Accession # HHCC.2003.116
Exhibit: Refrigeration & Air Conditioning

AN INTEGRAL HP COMPRESSOR (3 TO 5 HP), BRUNER CORPORATION, MODEL T6-53, Circa 1953 – A weighty and relatively crude, open system compressor, widely employed in food store applications, prior to the adoption of sealed hermetic refrigeration machines in this capacity range. Following the development of the large food chains throughout Canada in the 1950’s and 60’s, these machines would be found hidden away in machine rooms across the country, helping to provide Canadian’s with their first large food store shopping experience.



Item: 3-5 HP compressor ‘T6-53’
Manufacturer: Bruner Corporation, Port Hope Ontario
Make: Bruner
Model: T6-53

2-3 HP compressor ‘R?’

Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Compressors – Commercial

Accession # HHCC.2003.117
Exhibit: Refrigeration & Air Conditioning

AN INTEGRAL HP COMPRESSOR (2 TO 3 HP), BY FRIGIDAIRE, possibly MODEL R, CIRCA 1942 – it would be representative of a new generation of open system refrigeration compressors for F12 refrigerant, which began to emerge in the late 1930’s. With a whopping 17 inch, twin V belt fly wheel, in formed and riveted steel plate, it followed the slow speed, high displacement compressor design idiom preferred by Frigidaire in the period. It would come to stand as an historic marker of the end of an epic era in refrigeration machinery engineering.



Item: 2-3 HP compressor ‘R?’
Manufacturer: Frigidair Div. General Motors Corporation
Make: Frigidaire
Model: R [see note]

1-3 HP compressor ‘6R?’

Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Compressors – Commercial

Accession # HHCC.2003.118
Exhibit: Refrigeration & Air Conditioning

AN INTEGRAL HP COMPRESSOR (1 TO 3 HP), FOR SULPHUR DIOXIDE REFRIGERANT BY FRIGIDAIRE, POSSIBLY MODEL 6R, CIRCA 1936- with 16 inch flywheel, it would be come to represent the company’s last years of design and production of slow speed, high displacement, open system refrigeration compressors for S02 refrigerant.



Item: 1-3 HP compressor ‘6R?’
Manufacturer: Frigidaire Div. General Motors Corporation
Make: Frigidaire
Model: Possibly 6R (se


2-3 HP compressor ‘R?’

Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Compressors – Commercial

Accession # HHCC.2003.119
Exhibit: Refrigeration & Air Conditioning

AN INTEGRAL HP COMPRESSOR (2 TO 3 HP), BY FRIGIDAIRE, POSSIBLY PART OF THEIR MODEL R SERIES, CIRCA 1942 – it would also be part of the company’s new generation of open system refrigeration compressors for F12 refrigerant, which began to emerge in the late 1930’s [see also #117]. With a 17 inch, twin V belt fly wheel, in formed and riveted steel plate, it also followed the slow speed, high displacement compressor design preferred by Frigidaire in the period, and would come to stand as an historic marker of the end of an epic era in refrigeration machinery engineering.



Item: 2-3 HP compressor ‘R?’
Manufacturer: Frigidair Div. General Motors Corporation
Make: Frigidaire
Model: 6R (see note)

1 1/2-3 HP compressor ‘5208’

Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Compressors – Commercial

Accession # HHCC.2003.120
Exhibit: Refrigeration & Air Conditioning

AN INTEGRAL HP COMPRESSOR (1 1/2 TO 3 HP), BY KELVINATOR, MARKED # 5208, CIRCA 1928 – With water cooled head and 17 inch, 25 lb. flywheel, in Kelvinator red [possibly not the original], it would be representative of the company’s early years, as well as those of the industry, in the design and production of such refrigeration machines, opening up an new epic period, providing for the first time automatic, mechanically cooled, commercial food storage for Canadians.



Item: 1 1/2-3 HP compressor ‘5208’
Manufacturer: Kelvinator of Canada, London Ontario
Make: Kelvinator
Features:
– water cooled head- attachment bracket for low pressure control

1 1/2-3 HP compressor ‘5208’

Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Compressors – Commercial

Accession # HHCC.2003.121
Exhibit: Refrigeration & Air Conditioning

AN INTEGRAL HP COMPRESSOR (1 1/2 TO 3 HP), BY KELVINATOR, MARKED # 5208, CIRCA 1928 – With water cooled head it would be representative of the company’s early years, as well as those of the industry, in the design and production of such refrigeration machines, opening up an new epic period, providing for the first time automatic, mechanically cooled commercial food storage for Canadians.



Item: 1 1/2-3 HP compressor ‘5208’
Manufacturer: Kelvinator of Canada, London Ontario
Make: Kelvinator

1-2 HP compressor ‘T’

Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Compressors – Commercial

Accession # HHCC.2003.122
Exhibit: Refrigeration & Air Conditioning

AN INTEGRAL HP COMPRESSOR (1 TO 2 HP), BY INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER, MODEL T, CIRCA 1948 – A distinctive compressor in design and styling, marketed by a “come-lately” company to the field of refrigeration machinery, a well known supplier to the Canadian agricultural sector, hoping to secure a market share in the then rapidly expanding, specialised niche market for farm milk can cooling.



Item: 1-2 HP compressor ‘T’
Manufacturer: International Harvester Co. , likely a stencil lin
Make: International Harvester
Model: T

Industrial Significance:
In the 1940’s through early 60’s the farm milk cooler trade in Canada, was a strong market for refrigeration equipment. With many small milk producers scattered over the country side, prior to the dramatic changes starting in the 1960’s which would consolidate the industry, weeding the small farm production unit.


2-3 HP compressor ‘A’

Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Compressors – Commercial

Accession # HHCC.2003.123
Exhibit: Refrigeration & Air Conditioning

AN INTEGRAL HP COMPRESSOR (2 TO 3 HP), BY UNIVERSAL COOLER, TYPE A, CIRCA 1952 – With 12 inch flywheel, designed for twin V belt drive, this twin cylinder, open system compressor, among the last of a breed, would mark the movement to increasingly higher compression speeds, a precursor of the then imminent move to direct drive, high speed hermetic motor compressor engineering.



Item: 2-3 HP compressor ‘A’
Manufacturer: Universal cooler
Make: Universal Cooler
Model: A

Massive 3-5 HP compressor ‘G’

Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Compressors – Commercial

Accession # HHCC.2003.124
Exhibit: Refrigeration & Air Conditioning

A MASSIVE, INTEGRAL HP COMPRESSOR (3 TO 5 HP), BY KELVINATOR, Model G, CIRCA 1955 – This 150 lb, compressor [refrigeration by the ton], with water cooled head, would be representative of the company’s last years in the engineering and production of refrigeration compressors, as the market for refrigeration machinery was dramatically restructured both by changes in the technology and new comers to the field of refrigeration engineering and manufacture.



Item: Massive 3-5 HP compressor ‘G’
Manufacturer: Kelvinator, UK
Make: Kelvinator
Model: G

Radiant heat sensor

Pressure Atomizing Oil Burner Equipment and Systems – Fuel Flow and Combustion Controls

Accession # HHCC.2006.109
Exhibit: Heating

The “Protectostat”, a late 1940’s radiant heat sensor for combustion safety control. It would set new standard for combustion safety for higher firing rate, oil atomizing heating systems found in large Canadian estate homes, institutions and small industrial applications. Sited directly on the fire, it used a black metal diaphragm to mechanically actuate a low voltage control system through a Minneapolis Honeywell “Protectorelay”, Minneapolis Honeywell, Type A, Circa 1948.



Item: Radiant heat sensor
Manufacturer: Minneapolis Honeywell Regulator Co.
Make: Minneapolis Honeywell
Model: Type A
Features:
– Handsome corporate name plate and logo in red, black and chrome

Technical Significance:
– Mounted adjacent to the burner fire tube, the device immediately sensed the radiant heat of combustion, providing here-to-for unheard of rapid response needed for the safe and satisfactory operation of larger oil fired boilers and furnaces, operating in the range of 3 to 12 gallons per minute of number 2 or 3 fuel oil.
– The Protectostat operated a Minneapolis Protectorelay, consisting of electro-magnetic switches and a thermal safety, automatic cut out timing device.
– The Protectostat with Protectorelay would become the standard of the industry for institutional and small commercial and industrial, automatic oil fired systems until the introduction of photo-electric eye, electronic sensing technology in the 1950’s, see reference.
– These embryonic, electric automated systems were representative of the early introduction of complex systems into Canadian homes and places of business. See Note #2

Industrial Significance:
– The potential explosive power of several gallons per minute of high pressure vapourized fuel oil being sprayed into a combustion chamber is awesome and a source of fear to system owners, operators and service people alike. The importance of fast response for safety shut down in case of delayed ignition on unattended, automatic systems is paramount. The development of the radiant heat sensor opened up new applications for automatic operation of boilers, where operating engineers in constant attendance became unnecessary under certain conditions.


Hard fire brick

Pressure Atomizing Oil Burner Equipment and Systems – Other Components and Parts

Accession # HHCC.2006.119
Exhibit: Heating

In the embryonic and early development years of automatic, oil heating systems in Canada, high temperature fire brick were the building blocks of the “fire box” [combustion chamber]. The firebox, holding a 2.600 degree F. flame in check, was a critical component, determining both system safety and performance. It would be skilfully crafted on-the-job, according to the size of the fire chamber, the combustion rate and the unique flame configuration of the oil burner, hard fire brick, A P Green, Circa 1938.



Item: Hard fire brick
Manufacturer: A P Green, Toronto
Make: A P Green
Model: A – Empire DP

Technical Significance:
In the embryonic and early development years of automatic, oil heating systems in Canada, high temperature “Hard” fire brick were the building blocks of the “fire box” [combustion chamber]. Shaped much like regular bricks, but made from clays withstanding high temperature.

The firebox, holding a 2.600 degree F. flame in check, was a critical component, determining both system safety and performance, a matter of concern for the installer and technician.

It would be skilfully crafted on-the-job, according to the combustion rate and the unique flame configuration of the oil burner the size of the fire chamber and the gut feel of the installer.

Industrial Significance:
The construction of fireboxes was an art form of the day, with all to often little for the installer to guide him in a wide range of decisions to be made, effecting the performance of the oil burner and the safety of the system see references.

Most heating automatic oil heating systems of the 1920’s on into the 40’s in Canada were of the “conversion” type, typically coal and wood fired furnaces and boilers in which oil burners were installed. Wood and coal grates were removed and firebrick used to build a box like configuration, typically, but not always, with a hole at one end to receive the blast tube of the oil burner.

With the evolution of the industry came softer lighter fire brick, see ID#244, as well as pre-cast moulded refractory materials, in a range of sizes, pre-shaped for certain firing rates and fire chambers, see ID#245.

The significant developments in ceramics engineering, reflected in the refractory materials of the period, should not be understated, for they made possible the evolution of automatic home heating and its seminal contribution to life in Canada. An unobtrusive technology in the public eye, the accomplishments in ceramics engineering tend to get lost in the midst of the Gee-Whiz technological achievements in combustion and electric control engineering of the 1920’s and 30’s.

By the 1960’s much ceramic-based combustion chamber engineering would give way to light weight stainless steel configurations, considered preferable for the new world of unitary equipment, pre-tested and shipped to the job site ready for installation.


‘Soft’ fire brick

Pressure Atomizing Oil Burner Equipment and Systems – Other Components and Parts

Accession # HHCC.2006.120
Exhibit: Heating

In the embryonic and early development years of automatic, oil heating systems in Canada, high temperature fire brick were the building blocks of the “fire box” [combustion chamber]. The firebox, holding a 2.600 degree F. flame in check, was a critical component, determining both system safety and performance. It would be skilfully crafted on-the-job, according to the size of the fire chamber, the combustion rate and the unique flame configuration of the oil burner, “soft” fire brick, A P Green, Circa 1940.



Item: ‘Soft’ fire brick
Manufacturer: A P Green, Toronto
Make: A P Green

Technical Significance:
With the evolution of the industry came soft light weight fire brick, as well as pre-cast moulded refractory materials, in a range of sizes, pre-shaped for certain firing rates and fire chambers, see ID#245

In the embryonic and early development years of automatic, oil heating systems in Canada, high temperature fire brick were the building blocks of the “fire box” [combustion chamber]. Shaped much like regular bricks, but made from clays withstanding high temperature

The firebox, holding a 2.600 degree F. flame in check, was a critical component, determining both system safety and performance, a matter of concern for the installer and technician.

It would be skilfully crafted on-the-job, according to the combustion rate and the unique flame configuration of the oil burner the size of the fire chamber and the gut feel of the installer.

Industrial Significance:
The construction of fireboxes was an art form of the day, with all to often little for the installer to guide him in a wide range of decisions to be made, effecting the performance of the oil burner and the safety of the system see references

Most heating automatic oil heating systems of the 1920’s on into the 40’s in Canada were of the “conversion” type, typically coal and wood fired furnaces and boilers in which oil burners were installed. Wood and coal grates were removed and firebrick used to build a box like configuration, typically, but not always, with a hole at one end to receive the blast tube of the oil burner.

The significant developments in ceramics engineering, reflected in the refractory materials of the period, should not be understated, for they made possible the evolution of automatic home heating and its seminal contribution to life in Canada. An unobtrusive technology in the public eye, the accomplishments in ceramics engineering tend to get lost in the midst of the Gee-Whiz technological achievements in combustion and electric control engineering of the 1920’s and 30’s.

By the 1960’s much ceramic-based combustion chamber engineering would give way to light weight stainless steel configurations, considered preferable for the new world of unitary equipment, pre-tested and shipped to the job site ready for installation.


Fire box sections

Pressure Atomizing Oil Burner Equipment and Systems – Other Components and Parts

Accession # HHCC.2006.121
Exhibit: Heating

Pre-cast, sectional, circular, high temperature refractory sections, made in a range of sizes and compositions, became widely used starting in the 1940’s for the construction of “fire boxes” [combustion chambers]. The firebox, holding a 2.600 degree F. flame in check, was a critical component, determining both system safety and performance, 2 sections, model 424, A P Green, Circa 1945.



Item: Fire box sections
Manufacturer: A P Green, Toronto
Make: A P Green
Model: 424

Technical Significance:
With the evolution of the industry came pre-formed, sectional, circular refractory sections in a range of sizes, pre-shaped for certain firing rates and fire chambers

The evolution of pre-formed, sectional, circular refractory was hastened by the development of unitary, factory made and assembled warm air furnaces, winter air conditioners and hot water home heating boilers. Shipped to the job site this equipment came complete with oil burner, refractory and control system reedy for installation.

Industrial Significance:
With the evolution of unitary equipment for residential heating in Canada came generally higher levels of system performance, reliability and safety, with much of the guess work required with the conversion of hand fired wood and coal fired systems gone.

The significant developments in ceramics engineering, reflected in the refractory materials of the period, should not be understated, for they made possible the evolution of automatic home heating and its seminal contribution to life in Canada. An unobtrusive technology in the public eye, the accomplishments in ceramics engineering tend to get lost in the midst of the Gee-Whiz technological achievements in combustion and electric control engineering of the 1920’s and 30’s.

By the 1960’s much ceramic-based combustion chamber engineering would give way to light weight stainless steel configurations, considered preferable for the new world of unitary equipment, pre-tested and shipped to the job site ready for installation.


Set of inside diameter gauges

Electric Motors – Installation, Test and Repair

Accession # HHCC.2006.214

Set of 4 telescoping inside gauges, range ? inch to 2 1/8 inches, varying in thousands of an inch. Each is beautifully crafted in machine steel with spring loaded plunger, knurled handle and knurled locking screw embedded in the handle, an example of the precision tools available to Canadian machinists and HVACR mechanics by the 1940’s – on which they would depend. Used, among other things, to measure the inside diameter of electric motor bearings, compressor cylinder displacement etc. In hansom, slide-top, wooden box, Model 229, Starrett, Circa 1942.


Two inch Micrometer calliper

Electric Motors – Installation, Test and Repair

Accession # HHCC.2006.215

Two inch Micrometer calliper for measuring by thousandths from one inch to two inches, with ratchet stop, knurled handle, and fraction/decimal equivalent chart engraved on yoke in 32nds and 64ths. An example of the precision tools available to Canadian machinists and HVACR mechanics by the 1940’s – on which they would be dependent. Used, among other things, to measure the diameter of electric motor bearings, compressor pistons, etc. Beranta, Circa 1942.


Bearing scraper

Electric Motors – Installation, Test and Repair

Accession # HHCC.2006.216

An 11 inch, narrow, bearing scraper, with 3 inch blade, designed for “modern bearings”, with black, turned, wooden handle and steel furl, an early 20th century tool for hand fitting journal bearings, “VLC4BK” CLEV’D.O., Circa 1930.


4 blade small bearing reamers

Electric Motors – Installation, Test and Repair

Accession # HHCC.2006.217

Set of 4 blade, small bearing reamers in sizes from ? to 7/16 inches, used in HVACR equipment repair shop for the fitting of small, FHP electric motor bearings, in the 1940’s through 1960’s. Set of 7 enclosed in original blue, heavy card, custom case, with Beard logo and name plate stencilled in gold and blue, Circa 1945.


6 blade bearing reamers

Electric Motors – Installation, Test and Repair

Accession # HHCC.2006.218

Set of 6 blade, bearing reamers in sizes from 7/16 to 1 1/8 inches, used in HVACR equipment repair shop for the fitting of FHP electric motor bearings, in the 1930’s through 1960’s. Set of 9 enclosed in original heavy oak, clear varnished, custom case with manufacturer’s label, insignia and specifications in gold and black, Circa 1939.


Long 6 blade bearing reamers

Electric Motors – Installation, Test and Repair

Accession # HHCC.2006.219

Set of 6 blade, extra long, alignment bearing reamers, six in Snap-On, Blue Point case, sizes from ? to 1 1/16; with four supplementary reamers to extend range from 9/16 to 15/16, all with tapered self-alignment pilots, used in HVACR equipment repair shop for the fitting of FHP electric motor bearings, in the 1950’s through 1960’s, Variously made by Snap-On, Joborn and Webco, Circa 1958


3-5 HP compressor ‘T6-53’

Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Compressors – Commercial

Accession # HHCC.2003.116
Exhibit: Refrigeration & Air Conditioning

AN INTEGRAL HP COMPRESSOR (3 TO 5 HP), BRUNER CORPORATION, MODEL T6-53, Circa 1953 – A weighty and relatively crude, open system compressor, widely employed in food store applications, prior to the adoption of sealed hermetic refrigeration machines in this capacity range. Following the development of the large food chains throughout Canada in the 1950’s and 60’s, these machines would be found hidden away in machine rooms across the country, helping to provide Canadian’s with their first large food store shopping experience.



Item: 3-5 HP compressor ‘T6-53’
Manufacturer: Bruner Corporation, Port Hope Ontario
Make: Bruner
Model: T6-53

2-3 HP compressor ‘R?’

Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Compressors – Commercial

Accession # HHCC.2003.117
Exhibit: Refrigeration & Air Conditioning

AN INTEGRAL HP COMPRESSOR (2 TO 3 HP), BY FRIGIDAIRE, possibly MODEL R, CIRCA 1942 – it would be representative of a new generation of open system refrigeration compressors for F12 refrigerant, which began to emerge in the late 1930’s. With a whopping 17 inch, twin V belt fly wheel, in formed and riveted steel plate, it followed the slow speed, high displacement compressor design idiom preferred by Frigidaire in the period. It would come to stand as an historic marker of the end of an epic era in refrigeration machinery engineering.



Item: 2-3 HP compressor ‘R?’
Manufacturer: Frigidair Div. General Motors Corporation
Make: Frigidaire
Model: R [see note]

1-3 HP compressor ‘6R?’

Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Compressors – Commercial

Accession # HHCC.2003.118
Exhibit: Refrigeration & Air Conditioning

AN INTEGRAL HP COMPRESSOR (1 TO 3 HP), FOR SULPHUR DIOXIDE REFRIGERANT BY FRIGIDAIRE, POSSIBLY MODEL 6R, CIRCA 1936- with 16 inch flywheel, it would be come to represent the company’s last years of design and production of slow speed, high displacement, open system refrigeration compressors for S02 refrigerant.



Item: 1-3 HP compressor ‘6R?’
Manufacturer: Frigidaire Div. General Motors Corporation
Make: Frigidaire
Model: Possibly 6R (se


2-3 HP compressor ‘R?’

Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Compressors – Commercial

Accession # HHCC.2003.119
Exhibit: Refrigeration & Air Conditioning

AN INTEGRAL HP COMPRESSOR (2 TO 3 HP), BY FRIGIDAIRE, POSSIBLY PART OF THEIR MODEL R SERIES, CIRCA 1942 – it would also be part of the company’s new generation of open system refrigeration compressors for F12 refrigerant, which began to emerge in the late 1930’s [see also #117]. With a 17 inch, twin V belt fly wheel, in formed and riveted steel plate, it also followed the slow speed, high displacement compressor design preferred by Frigidaire in the period, and would come to stand as an historic marker of the end of an epic era in refrigeration machinery engineering.



Item: 2-3 HP compressor ‘R?’
Manufacturer: Frigidair Div. General Motors Corporation
Make: Frigidaire
Model: 6R (see note)

1 1/2-3 HP compressor ‘5208’

Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Compressors – Commercial

Accession # HHCC.2003.120
Exhibit: Refrigeration & Air Conditioning

AN INTEGRAL HP COMPRESSOR (1 1/2 TO 3 HP), BY KELVINATOR, MARKED # 5208, CIRCA 1928 – With water cooled head and 17 inch, 25 lb. flywheel, in Kelvinator red [possibly not the original], it would be representative of the company’s early years, as well as those of the industry, in the design and production of such refrigeration machines, opening up an new epic period, providing for the first time automatic, mechanically cooled, commercial food storage for Canadians.



Item: 1 1/2-3 HP compressor ‘5208’
Manufacturer: Kelvinator of Canada, London Ontario
Make: Kelvinator
Features:
– water cooled head- attachment bracket for low pressure control

1 1/2-3 HP compressor ‘5208’

Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Compressors – Commercial

Accession # HHCC.2003.121
Exhibit: Refrigeration & Air Conditioning

AN INTEGRAL HP COMPRESSOR (1 1/2 TO 3 HP), BY KELVINATOR, MARKED # 5208, CIRCA 1928 – With water cooled head it would be representative of the company’s early years, as well as those of the industry, in the design and production of such refrigeration machines, opening up an new epic period, providing for the first time automatic, mechanically cooled commercial food storage for Canadians.



Item: 1 1/2-3 HP compressor ‘5208’
Manufacturer: Kelvinator of Canada, London Ontario
Make: Kelvinator

1-2 HP compressor ‘T’

Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Compressors – Commercial

Accession # HHCC.2003.122
Exhibit: Refrigeration & Air Conditioning

AN INTEGRAL HP COMPRESSOR (1 TO 2 HP), BY INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER, MODEL T, CIRCA 1948 – A distinctive compressor in design and styling, marketed by a “come-lately” company to the field of refrigeration machinery, a well known supplier to the Canadian agricultural sector, hoping to secure a market share in the then rapidly expanding, specialised niche market for farm milk can cooling.



Item: 1-2 HP compressor ‘T’
Manufacturer: International Harvester Co. , likely a stencil lin
Make: International Harvester
Model: T

Industrial Significance:
In the 1940’s through early 60’s the farm milk cooler trade in Canada, was a strong market for refrigeration equipment. With many small milk producers scattered over the country side, prior to the dramatic changes starting in the 1960’s which would consolidate the industry, weeding the small farm production unit.


2-3 HP compressor ‘A’

Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Compressors – Commercial

Accession # HHCC.2003.123
Exhibit: Refrigeration & Air Conditioning

AN INTEGRAL HP COMPRESSOR (2 TO 3 HP), BY UNIVERSAL COOLER, TYPE A, CIRCA 1952 – With 12 inch flywheel, designed for twin V belt drive, this twin cylinder, open system compressor, among the last of a breed, would mark the movement to increasingly higher compression speeds, a precursor of the then imminent move to direct drive, high speed hermetic motor compressor engineering.



Item: 2-3 HP compressor ‘A’
Manufacturer: Universal cooler
Make: Universal Cooler
Model: A

Massive 3-5 HP compressor ‘G’

Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Compressors – Commercial

Accession # HHCC.2003.124
Exhibit: Refrigeration & Air Conditioning

A MASSIVE, INTEGRAL HP COMPRESSOR (3 TO 5 HP), BY KELVINATOR, Model G, CIRCA 1955 – This 150 lb, compressor [refrigeration by the ton], with water cooled head, would be representative of the company’s last years in the engineering and production of refrigeration compressors, as the market for refrigeration machinery was dramatically restructured both by changes in the technology and new comers to the field of refrigeration engineering and manufacture.



Item: Massive 3-5 HP compressor ‘G’
Manufacturer: Kelvinator, UK
Make: Kelvinator
Model: G